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Pics of the Parks entries capture true nature

Stunning sunsets, glimpses of nature and a ton of fun in the parks were all captured in images submitted for the Oakland County Parks’ Pic of the Parks Photo Contest.

Forty-six photographers entered 146 images in the annual competition’s five categories: Parks; Artistic; Recreation; Kids; and Dogs. All photos were judged by members of the Oakland Camera Club.

Photographer and radio personality Spike, of Channel 955’s Mojo in the Morning Show, chose the Best of Show Photo, “Sunset on the Lake,” taken at Independence Oaks County Park by Wai Nguyen of Troy.  “This year's entries reflected so many great recreational uses of the parks, showing park visitors enjoying the vast array of activities and events offered by the parks system,” Spike said. “The image I chose, Sunset on the Lake, highlights the real star attraction – nature. This photo perfectly captures the serene lake, a beautiful sunset and the peaceful surroundings. The photographer used the leading lines of the stairs to pave an easy path to guide the eye upwards and inwards to the beckoning picnic bench on the dock. It makes me want to visit this park.”

This photo will be featured on the cover of the 2017 Oakland County Parks Annual Report. 

All contest entries are available for viewing at OaklandCountyParks.SmugMug.com. The Best of Show and First Place winners in each category receive mounted prints of their entries, which are on display at the Oakland County Executive Office Building through Oct. 20, Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. The Executive Office Building is located at 2100 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford. Other honorees will receive a certificate featuring their photo.

“This year the rules allowed for only one honor per category for each participant, in order to allow more participants to win recognition. As a result, 24 photographers earned honors in this year’s competition,” Executive Officer Dan Stencil said. “We are grateful to these photographers for sharing the faces and places that are the Oakland County Parks.”

Other winners include:

Parks Category
1st Place – Eastern Kingbird, taken at Independence Oaks, Rob Craig of Berkley
2nd Place – Dock Entrance, taken at Independence Oaks, Vickie Johnson of Pontiac
3rd Place – Peaceful Reflections, taken at White Lake Oaks, Emily Barberi of Waterford
Honorable Mention – Deux, taken at Independence Oaks, Gloria Boddy of Clarkston
Honorable Mention – Barred Owl, taken at Independence Oaks, Mary Ann Kennedy of Waterford
Honorable Mention – The Dock, taken at Orion Oaks, Carole Baier of Pontiac

Artistic Category
1st Place – Cowboys, taken at Springfield Oaks, Kathy Rollins of Davisburg
2nd Place – Exploring, taken at Orion Oaks, Nancy Henahan of Farmington Hills
3rd Place – Flown in Fresh, taken at Waterford Oaks, Martha Myers of Oxford
Honorable Mention – Clouds, taken at Highland Oaks, Nichole Hortick of Waterford
Honorable Mention – Fall at Independence, taken at Independence Oaks, Diane Kish of Clarkston
Honorable Mention – Purple Haze, taken at Independence Oaks, Diane Wilks of Rochester Hills

Recreation Category
1st Place – Focus, taken at Independence Oaks, Martha Myers of Oxford
2nd Place – Fun in the Sunset, taken at Orion Oaks, Carole Baier of Pontiac
3rd Place – Into the Fog, taken at Independence Oaks, Allie Werner of Clarkston
Honorable Mention – Buhl Lake Kayaker, taken at Addison Oaks, William Spengler of Warren
Honorable Mention – Straight Away, taken at Addison Oaks, Frank Leone of Shelby Twp
Honorable Mention – Ele-fun Ears, taken at Addison Oaks, Toni Rose Arceno of Southfield

Kids Category
1st Place – Little Barrel Racer, taken at Springfield Oaks, Kathy Rollins of Davisburg
2nd Place – Let’s Race, taken at Springfield Oaks, Nichole Hortick of Waterford
3rd Place – Ryan Jumping, taken at Independence Oaks, Riley Kisser of Clarkston
Honorable Mention – Kallie with Flowers, taken at Lyon Oaks, Tina Gray of Commerce
Honorable Mention – The Cousin Catch, taken at Independence Oaks, Martha Myers of Oxford
Honorable Mention – Sharing Brownies, taken at Groveland Oaks, Jennifer Smith of White Lake

Dogs Category
1st Place – Smile, taken at Highland Oaks, Nichole Hortick of Waterford
2nd Place – Mr. Belvedere’s Big Smile, taken at Orion Oaks, Jon Olszowy of Ferndale
3rd Place – I Can Do Anything, taken at Orion Oaks, Linda Harms of Orion Twp
Honorable Mention – Harley Contest, taken at Orion Oaks, Lindsay Kotlarz of Commerce
Honorable Mention – Tug of War, taken at Lyon Oaks, Nancy Henahan of Farmington Hills
Honorable Mention – Gotta Get the Fishy, taken at Orion Oaks, Beth Champagne of Clarkston

Photographers are encouraged to keep shooting throughout the year at the 13 Oakland County parks. Entries will again be accepted between Memorial Day and Labor Day, 2018. The 2018 Rules and entry form will be available at OaklandCountyParks.com in April.

For details on upcoming events and activities, visit OaklandCountyParks.com. Get social with Oakland County Parks and Recreation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


Arts, Beats & Eats raises over $275,000 for charitable groups

Excerpt: 

Gate admissions, sponsors and beverage sales at this year’s Ford Arts, Beats & Eats festival in Royal Oak raised more than $275,000 for local charities.

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Tradition meets modern conveniences at The Lyon theater

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There was a time when most  towns had a downtown movie theater — a place with one large screen where you'd walk up to get your ticket without going through the lobby of a multi-plex.

A fixture on E. Lake Street since the 1945, The Lyon is still that kind of theater. It reopened last month after  remodeling that includes new seats.

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Polk Penguin Conservation Center named 2017 exhibit award winner

The Detroit Zoo’s Polk Penguin Conservation Center received the 2017 Exhibit Award from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) on September 12 during its annual conference, held this year in Indianapolis. The award is the top honor bestowed annually upon accredited institutions for excellence in exhibit design.

“This award is the highest honor in exhibit design, and recognizes the Detroit Zoo for their dedication and expertise in designing a novel, immersive habitat that provides the best in animal care and welfare as well as a superior educational experience for visitors,” said Dan Ashe, AZA president and CEO.

The penguin center opened in April 2016 and led the Detroit Zoo to record-breaking attendance last year. Among the most spectacular features of the $31-million, 33,000-square-foot facility is a 326,000-gallon, 25-foot-deep aquatic area where visitors can watch more than 80 penguins of four species – king, gentoo, macaroni and rockhopper – explore their habitat. An underwater gallery with a vast acrylic window and two acrylic tunnels provides breathtaking views of the birds below water and allows guests to get nose to beak with the charismatic birds in aquatic “flight”.

“An incredible amount of creativity, ingenuity and research went into the development of the Polk Penguin Conservation Center’s unique design, including crossing the Drake Passage to Antarctica and observing thousands of penguins in the wild,” said Ron Kagan, executive director and CEO for the Detroit Zoological Society (DZS). “We wanted first and foremost to create an experience that allowed the penguins to thrive and that was also thrilling for our visitors. The result is the most extraordinary conservation center for penguins in the world that redefines ‘state of the art’ for zoo penguin habitats.”

While the facility provides a remarkable experience for people, the penguin habitat itself is designed to ensure an optimal atmosphere for the welfare of the birds. Their air temperature is set to a near-freezing 37 degrees Fahrenheit and the water at 40 degrees Fahrenheit. The environment encourages wild behavior, from diving and porpoising to nesting and rearing young.

Inspired by Sir Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Antarctic expedition and epic crossing of the Drake Passage, the Polk Penguin Conservation Center evokes the harsh and visceral ice world of the southern continent, recreated in a 360-degree 4-D entry experience on the deck of Shackleton’s ship that includes blasts of polar air, sea mist and snow. Reminiscent of a tabular iceberg with a crevasse and waterfall, the striking exterior conjures the stark and beautiful Antarctic icescape.

The Polk Penguin Conservation Center was designed by Jones & Jones, architects of the Detroit Zoo’s Arctic Ring of Life and National Amphibian Conservation Center, and by Albert Kahn Associates, architects of the Zoo’s Ruth Roby Glancy Animal Health Complex. World-renowned polar ecologist and penguin expert Dr. Bill Fraser, director of the Polar Oceans Research Group, was a key consultant on the project.

The AZA is the accrediting body for the top zoos and aquariums in the U.S. and seven other countries; there are currently 231 accredited institutions, including the Detroit Zoo, which has been continuously accredited since 1985. The AZA is dedicated to the advancement of zoos and aquariums in the areas of conservation, animal welfare, education, science and recreation.

Top five artists chosen from 232 as 2017 MI Great Artist online competition gets down to business

Five artists will vie for the top spot in the 2017 MI Great Artist online competition and a share of more than $16,000 in cash and prizes.

Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson announced the finalists.

“These are supremely talented individuals,” Patterson said. “Their skill and passion is evident in the incredible works they’ve created. I encourage everyone to go to Park West Gallery and see these wonderful pieces in person.”

The finalists listed alphabetically are:
  • Meredith Lea Bailey, watercolor on paper – Rochester Hills
  • Michael Bollerud, graphite pencil on paper – Taylor
  • Margret Grace McDermott, oil on panel and linen – Clarkston
  • Thomas Tunney, oil on panel – Commerce Township
  • Jennifer M. Whaley, graphite on paper – Rochester Hills
Patterson and Albert Scaglione, founder and CEO of Park West Gallery in Southfield, launched the contest in 2012 as a quality of life initiative to identify and support up-and-coming artists. They will announce the winner during an Oct. 25 reception at Park West. It begins at 6 p.m. and is free and open to the public. The work of the five finalists will be on display at the gallery from Oct. 26 – Nov. 2.

The finalists were among 232 artists from Genesee, Lapeer, Livingston, Macomb, Oakland, St. Clair and Wayne counties who entered the online competition in September in hopes their entries would catch the discerning eye of the public.

After more than 34,500 votes were cast, the field was whittled down to 22 artists and presented to the judges: Scaglione; Elliott W. Broom, vice president of museum operations at the Detroit Institute of Arts; Dominic Pangborn, founder of Pangborn Design Collection and a former professor at the College of Creative Studies; artist and sculptor Don Tocco; and Kristie Everett Zamora, coordinator of arts and culture for Oakland County's Department of Economic Development & Community Affairs.

The MI Great Artist winner will receive a $1,500 cash prize; five submitted artworks framed by Park West Gallery; a group exhibition at Park West Oct. 26– Nov. 2, with an award ceremony and reception; a scholarship to attend three Business Basics workshops at the Oakland County One Stop Shop Business Center; a one-hour consultation with an Oakland County business development representative; their artwork featured on a poster to promote one of Oakland County’s signature quality of life events; a solo exhibition at Park West; and a two-month solo exhibition at the Oakland County Galleria in the Executive Office Building in Waterford.

Four runners-up will each receive a $375 cash prize and other services. MI Great Artist partners include Oakland County, Park West Gallery, the Economic Growth Alliance, AdvantageOakland.com and Oakland County Prosper® magazine.

Detroit's Guardian Building gets high-end glass store

Excerpt:

Shopping in downtown Detroit just got more intriguing.

Epiphany Studios of Pontiac, which sells fine-art glass, has opened a handsome pop-up store in the Guardian Building that will be around at least through the holiday season.

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Enjoy fall fun at Oakland County Parks and Recreation

Autumn is a fabulous time to visit the parks and explore nature at Oakland County Parks and Recreation. With comfortable temperatures and spectacular scenery, plan an October camping trip to Addison Oaks and Groveland Oaks campgrounds, check out the bounty of fall produce at the Oakland County Farmers Market and enjoy Halloween events with the family. Celebrate autumn at these upcoming activities offered through Oakland County Parks and Recreation:

 

Oct. 1

  • Hometown Harvest is set from noon-3:30 p.m. Oct. 1 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. This fall extravaganza will feature live music, cider and donuts, farm animals and a festive craft. Children can try their skills on a climbing tower or jump away in a bounce house. Learn about some creepy critters and enjoy the start of fall colors at Suarez Friendship Woods. This free event is open to all ages. For more information, call 248-858-7759.

 

Oct. 5

  • Oakland County Parks and Recreation will host Awesome Autumn, a program for individuals 18 and older with developmental disabilities from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 5 at Waterford Oaks County Park Activity Center, 2800 Watkins Lake Road in Waterford. The event includes accessible hayrides and dinner. Cost is $10 participant/$5 caregiver. Pre-registration only; no walk-ins. Register by Sept. 27. Payment must accompany registration form, which can be found at OaklandCountyParks.com. Call 248-424-7081 or email Adaptive@oakgov.com for more information.

Oct. 6

  • Enjoy Dog Days Weekend Oct. 6-7 at Groveland Oaks Campground, 14555 Dixie Highway in Holly. Bring your pooch for a dog-gone good time. Dog lovers will enjoy dog fly ball, a silly dog show, dog swim, doggy games and hound hayrides. For more information, call 248-634-9811. To make a camping reservation, call 248-858-1400.

Oct. 7

  • Join Michigan State University Extension – Health & Nutrition for a Winter Squash Nutrition Program from 8 a.m.-noon Oct. 7 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Winter squash comes in so many wonderful varieties. Find out the difference between buttercup and butternut and all the rest of the winter squash grown locally. This program is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

 

  • Brownies: Bugs is set from 10 a.m.-noon or 2-4 p.m. Oct. 7 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. Naturalists will help scouts complete the necessary requirements to achieve a badge. Cost is $7/scout and $3/adult. Pre-registration is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or registration forms are available at OaklandCountyParks.com.

 

  • Put on your most eccentric hat and come to the nature center to celebrate Mad Hatter Day with a Mad Hatter TREE party from 1-2:30 p.m. Oct. 7 at Wit Nature Center in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Take a walk through the forest ad learn about some of the weird, wonderful and wackiest things about trees. Afterwards head inside for a craft, snack and of course, “Tea Time.” Cost is $7/person. Call 248-858-0916 for more information.

Oct. 10

  • Visit the Buhl Estate during the Addison Oaks Historical Tour from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 10 at Addison Oaks County Park, 1480 W. Romeo Road near Oxford. The tour includes a pasta and salad bar lunch, hayride, cider and donuts. Cost is $25/person Pre-register by Sept. 29. Payment must accompany registration form, which can be found at OaklandCountyParks.com. Details: 248-424-7081 or Adaptive@oakgov.com.

Oct. 12

  • Enjoy yoga from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Oct. 12 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. The lesson will take place on the grassy area to the west of the market building. Free yoga mats are available for the first 50 participants. This program is held in collaboration with Healthy Oakland Partnership. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

Oct. 13

  • Boo Bash I is Oct. 13-14 at Addison Oaks Campground, 1480 W. Romeo Road near Oxford. Enjoy frightful fun with a costume contest for all ages, campground trick or treating, Halloween face painting, inflatables, haunted house, family games, costumed DJ dance, campsite decorating contest, Halloween crafts and wagon rides. Most events take place on Saturday; see postings at campground for specific times. For more information, visit OakladCountyParks.com or call 248-693-2432. To make a camping reservation, call 248-858-1400.

 

Oct. 14

  • Join Oakland County 4-H staff and discover the endless opportunities available to youth and adult volunteers from 10 a.m.-noon Oct. 14 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Children can also create a simple, fun and free make-and-take craft courtesy of Michigan State University Extension – 4-H Youth Development. This program is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

 

  • Be sure to come hungry to the Oakland County Farmers Market on Oct. 14 to enjoy the Food Truck Rally. From 10 a.m.-1 p.m., visitors can indulge in savory BBQ, cool treats and freshly prepared culinary creations from popular vendors. The market will be open for shopping during the Food Truck Rally. Parking will be available at the market, the Road Commission of Oakland County lot located west of the market and at the lot located north of the market. The Oakland County Farmers Market is located at 2350 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford. Market hours are 7 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

 

  • Fun in the Fall is set from 2-4 p.m. Oct. 14 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. Press apples into cider, enjoy a fall snack and craft a leaf-print T-shirt. Hike the trails with a naturalist to see fall colors and learn how animals are preparing for winter. Bring a light-colored T-shirt for printing. Cost is $5/person. Pre-registration with payment required by calling 248-858-0916.

 

  • Bring the family to Autumn Magic from 2-4 p.m. Oct. 14 at Wit Nature Center in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Press apples into cider, enjoy a fall snack and craft a leaf-print T-shirt. Experience the magic of nature in the fall with naturalist-led activities. Bring a light-colored T-shirt for printing. Cost is $5/person. Pre-registration with payment required by calling 248-858-0916.

 

Oct. 18

  • Visit the Buhl Estate during the Addison Oaks Historical Tour from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 18 at Addison Oaks County Park, 1480 W. Romeo Road near Oxford. The tour includes a pasta and salad bar lunch, hayride, cider and donuts. Cost is $25/person Pre-register by Sept. 29. Payment must accompany registration form, which can be found at OaklandCountyParks.com. Details: 248-424-7081 or Adaptive@oakgov.com.

Oct. 20

  • Boo Bash II is Oct. 20-21 at Addison Oaks Campground, 1480 W. Romeo Road near Oxford. Enjoy frightful fun with a costume contest for all ages, campground trick or treating, Halloween face painting, inflatables, haunted house, family games, costumed DJ dance, campsite decorating contest, Halloween crafts and wagon rides. Most events take place on Saturday; see postings at campground for specific times. For more information, visit OakladCountyParks.com or call 248-693-2432. To make a camping reservation, call 248-858-1400.

Oct. 21

  • Join Michigan State University Extension – Master Gardeners for a Bean Necklace Program from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Oct. 21 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Make a bean necklace and learn how a bean seed grows under the ground, then plant the bean seeds at home and watch how they grow above the ground. This program is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

 

  • Jr. Girl Scouts: Geocacher is set from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. or 2-4:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at Wit Nature Center in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Naturalists will help scouts complete the necessary requirements to achieve a badge. Cost is $7/scout and $3/adult. Pre-registration is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or registration forms are available at OaklandCountyParks.com.

 

  • Skullduggery is set from 2-3:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. Discover the world of local wildlife and their surroundings. Become a forensic dentist and learn the story that teeth can tell you. Have you ever wondered about how animals think? The skull tells it all. Solve mysteries by using real animal skulls and test your own teeth on a tasty snack. Cost is $4/person. Pre-registration with payment required by calling 248-858-0916.

Oct. 24

  • Oakland County Parks and Recreation will host Halloween Happiness, a program for individuals 18 and older with developmental disabilities from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 24 at Southfield Civic Center, 26000 Evergreen Road in Southfield. The event includes music, dancing, trick or treating and pizza. Cost is $10/participant and $5/caregiver. Pre-registration only; no walk-ins. Register by Oct. 16. Payment must accompany registration form, which can be found at OaklandCountyParks.com. Call 248-424-7081 or email Adaptive@oakgov.com for more information.

Oct. 26

  • Equestrian Camping is Oct. 26-29 at Addison Oaks Campground, 1480 W. Romeo Road near Oxford. Enjoy an opportunity to camp with your horses at this event that is open only to equestrians. For more information, visit OakladCountyParks.com or call 248-693-2432. To make a camping reservation, call 248-858-1400.

Oct. 28

  • Join Michigan State University Extension – Health & Nutrition for a Legumes Nutrition Program from 8 a.m.-noon Oct. 28 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Learn about the benefits of adding legumes like dried peas and beans to your diet. Children can make a bean mosaic to take home, too. This program is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

 

  • Join Oakland County 4-H staff and discover the endless opportunities available to youth and adult volunteers from 10 a.m.-noon Oct. 28 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Children can also create a simple, fun and free make-and-take craft courtesy of Michigan State University Extension – 4-H Youth Development. This program is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

 

  • Trick or Trees is set from 5-8 p.m. Oct. 28 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. Come dressed i your favorite costume and enjoy a Trick-or-Treat Trail, costumed characters, face painting, cider and donuts and a nocturnal nature adventure. Bring a bag for each child's treats. Cost is $5/child, $1/adult by Oct. 25; $7/child after Oct. 25. Call 248-858-0916 to register. This event is sponsored by KIND Snacks. For more information, call 248-858-0916.

 

  • Trick or Treat at the Farmers Market is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 28 at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford. Trick or treat with market vendors and enjoy kids' games and activities. This event is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union. Visit OakladCountyParks.com or call 248-858-5495 for more information.

 

For information on other events, visit OaklandCountyParks.com. Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.


Detroit Institute of Arts to celebrate Japan Gallery opening Nov. 4

Excerpt

The Detroit Institute of Arts is planning a weekend of Japanese cultural events, including holiday drop-in workshops, drawing in the galleries, bilingual puppet performances, and more to mark the opening of a new Japan Gallery on Nov. 4.

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World War I and America coming this fall to the Orion Township Public Library

The Orion Township Public Library is one of 120 institutions nationwide that was recently awarded a World War I and America grant to host a series of events about the impact of WWI in America. The grant marks the 100th anniversary of the nation’s entry into the war in 1917.

 

“We apply for grants like World War 1 and America to bring high-quality speakers to our library at minimal cost, and to speak about subjects of interest to our patrons that align with our library mission ‘To serve and engage a thriving community of life-long learners,’” said Beth Sheridan, head of adult services at the Orion Library. “We hope that veterans and their families, and any interested patrons in our community, will attend these programs which will explore the American experience of the war and its role in shaping the contemporary world.”

 

The Orion Library is hosting the following events in October and November:

 

Discussion Series

Join Oakland University’s Dr. Karen Miller as she moderates a series of three discussions of readings drawn from the book World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Register for the whole series or any of the evenings online, and stop by the library to pick up the readings being discussed to read ahead of time. Discussions will also include other forms of media related to each evening’s themes.


Wednesday, October 11 @ 7:00p

Why Fight? The Experience of War, Race and WWI


Wednesday, October 18 @ 7:00p

American Women at War, The Home Front: Selling Unity, Suppressing Dissent


Wednesday, October 25 @ 7:00p

America on the World Stage, At Home/Coming Home; The Toll of War
 

Book Discussion

Monday, October 16 @ 7:00p

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

Copies available after September 18 at the Adult Reference desk.

 

World War I “Hello Girl,” Oleda Christides

Wednesday, November 1 @ 7:00p

Join local storyteller Lois Keel as she shares the story of how bilingual operators helped General Pershing in France.

 

PTSD: a Discussion for Veterans and Their Families with Dr. Eric BeShears, clinical psychologist with the John D. Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Tuesday, November 14 @ 7:00p

 

The Makings of America: A WWI Home Front Story

Saturday, November 18 @ 2:00p

Historian Dennis Skupinski will present an interactive program about WWI and Michigan.

 

For more information visit orionlibrary.org/ww1america.

 

This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of The Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362 and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information visit orionlibrary.org.


Fun for all at Ford Arts Beats & Eats

Excerpt

Ford Arts Beats & Eats, the annual festival filled with artwork, live music, and mouth-watering cuisine, is back for its 20th year this Labor Day weekend. From September 1st through 4th, festival-goers will be treated to special events and performances, including the 2017 Juried Fine Art Show and 200 live performances across several stages.

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Visit the breathtaking Cranbrook House & Gardens

Excerpt

From exquisite gardens, to a reflecting pool, and a stunning Japanese Garden, you’ll be enthralled with all that Cranbrook House and Gardens’ 40 acres of formal, woodland, and naturalistic gardens have to offer. The manicured gardens provide the perfect backdrop to the Cranbrook House, a National Historic Landmark and the oldest manor home in Metro-Detroit.

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34,500+ public votes whittle down 232 artists as MI Great Artist Competition teduced to top 22

Fourteen Oakland County residents, five from Macomb County and three from Wayne County are the 22 artists who have a chance at becoming the 2017 MI Great Artist winner.
 
More than 34,500 public votes were cast in 12 days during the online art competition. The field of 232 entrants was reduced to 22 semi-finalists for consideration by a panel of judges. Originally the top 20 artists were to be selected but the closeness of the voting and the quality of the entries made it necessary to include the additional two artists.
 
“I continue to be amazed by the work of these talented artists and how the public has embraced the competition,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “In less than two weeks, we had more than 34,500 votes – 15,000 more than we had last year. The contest gets bigger and better each year. I thank the artists for entering and congratulate those whose work will go before the judges.”
 
A panel of judges will review the work of the semi-finalists beginning Tuesday and announce the five finalists on September 19. Their work will be displayed at Park West Gallery in October. Patterson and Park West Gallery founder and CEO Albert Scaglione launched the contest in 2012 as a quality of life initiative to identify and support up-and-coming artists. They will announce the winner at an evening gallery reception on October 25. The finalists will share a prize package worth more than $16,000.
 
The judges are Scaglione; Elliott W. Broom, vice president of museum operations at the Detroit Institute of Arts; Dominic Pangborn, founder of Pangborn Design Collection and a former professor at the College of Creative Studies; artist and sculptor Don Tocco; and Kristie Everett Zamora, arts and culture coordinator for Oakland County's Department of Economic Development & Community Affairs.

The semi-finalists listed alphabetically are:
  • Meredith Lea Bailey - Rochester Hills
  • Michael Bollerud – Taylor
  • Nancy Jane Byrum – Wyandotte
  • Hailey Callahan - Rochester   
  • Rick Cook - Chesterfield
  • Caroline Del Giudice - Detroit 
  • Lacy Draper – Roseville
  • Kim F. Fujiwara - Rochester Hills
  • Andrew Groen - Rochester Hills
  • Margret Grace McDermott – Clarkston
  • Allison Michelini - West Bloomfield
  • Claudia Monet - Waterford
  • Kelly O'Hara - St. Clair Shores
  • Wendy C. Popko -Sterling Heights
  • Rachel Quinlan – St. Clair Shores
  • Arthur Mervyn Richards III - Madison Heights
  • Kimberly Kelly Santini - Lake Orion
  • William Bradshaw Ten Eick - West Bloomfield
  • Ellen Anne Tessada - Rochester Hills
  • Vasundhara Tolia - Bloomfield Hills
  • Thomas Tunney - Commerce
  • Jennifer M. Whaley - Rochester Hills
 
The MI Great Artist winner will receive $1,500; five submitted artworks framed by Park West Gallery; a group exhibition in October at Park West Gallery in Southfield, with an award ceremony and reception Oct. 25; and a selection of business services from the Oakland County One Stop Shop Business Center; among other prizes
 
Four runners-up will each receive $375 and other services.
 
MI Great Artist partners include Oakland County, Park West Gallery, AdvantageOakland.com and Oakland County Prosper® magazine. 
 

Turbine truck to speed down runway at OCIA Air Show

A Ford F-450 with three jet engines will throttle up at this year’s Oakland County International Airport (OCIA) Open House & Air Show on Sunday, Aug. 27. Homewrecker, a jet semi performance by McCart Jet Motorsports, is the newest act that will blow the hair off air show spectators.

“Homewrecker is expected to draw both aircraft and automotive enthusiasts alike as it speeds down the runway with the roar of its jet engines,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “Of course, our aerial acts will continue to dazzle the crowd with some death-defying aerobatics, thanks to the many sponsors that support this family-friendly event.”

The OCIA Open House & Air Show Committee gave fans more of what they love by extending the air show from an hour to an hour-and-a-half last year. This year’s airshow will again run from 2-3:30 p.m. because of last year’s success.

Michael Vaknin of Dacy Airshows will have spectators on the edge of their seats with gyroscopic and high-g maneuvers in his Extra 300 airplane. Greg Koontz and the Alabama Boys combine comedy with aviation antics culminating in the landing of a Piper Cub on top of a moving pick-up truck.

Kevin Copeland of KC Aerosports in Traverse City was set to return this year, but he died in a tragic motorcycle accident last month. Copeland was a big part of the air show family who will be missed by many. The OCIA Open House & Air Show Committee sent condolences to his family.

Two World War II-era planes from Liberty Aviation Museum of Port Clinton, Ohio will make their first appearances at the open house – a B-25 bomber named “Georgie’s Gal,” a fresh B-25 restoration, and a Lake Erie Warbirds TBM Avenger, a dive bomber. They will join over 50 aircraft on the ground with which open house attendees can interact such as the Tuskegee motor gliders, Oakland County Sheriff’s Office helicopter and hovercraft, and University of Michigan Survival Flight helicopter.

“We love hosting a variety of warbirds at our annual open house and air show,” said J. David Vanderveen, Oakland County director of central services who oversees the airport. “There is just something about these restored planes once flown by the Greatest Generation that captures the imagination.”

Individuals can take-off in a helicopter for $35 or an airplane for $25 per adult, $20 for kids under 12, and $55 for one adult and two kids.

For children there will be a play area equipped with bounce houses and a rock wall. Bill Crell, “The NASA Guy,” will show off his latest experiments and demonstrations. Plus, there will be a health and safety fair from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. including the Michigan Child ID Program, which informs families about abduction prevention and provides fingerprinting for children.

Attendees also may tour the nation’s first LEED-Gold certified general aviation terminal. Open since 2011, the eco-friendly terminal features solar panels and wind turbines, solar hot water heater, and a geothermal field all designed to reduce energy consumption. Today, the terminal has reduced its energy consumption by 44 percent.

“Whether you’re an aviation buff or just a kid deep down inside, the Open House & Air Show has something for everyone,” said Louis Martin, chair of the OCIA Open House & Air Show Committee. “This truly is an event the whole family can enjoy.”

OCIA’s 32nd annual open house hours will be from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. General admission is free. There is a $5 fee per vehicle for parking. For more information, go to www.OakGov.com/aviation or go to OCIA’s Facebook page at OakGovAirport and click on events. The airport is located at 6500 Patterson Parkway in Waterford.

The OCIA Open House & Air Show Committee would like to thank its sponsors: Suburban Ford, Page Toyota, ABC Harley Davidson, Aviation Station, Magnum Helicopters, Oscar W. Larson, Corrigan Oil, Encompass Management Group, and LL Johns & Associates.

Showplace to host Brickworld LEGO Exposition

Excerpt

Brickworld is excited be bringing a premiere LEGO display and exposition to the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi. The event will fill 40,000 square feet with displays, interactive activities and vendors.

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Oakland University unveils School of Music, Theatre and Dance

The Oakland University Board of Trustees voted at its August formal meeting to approve the creation of a School of Music, Theatre and Dance. This move follows a consistent expansion and transformation of programs offered by the Department of Music, Theatre and Dance over the past 32 years.
 
“We developed the School of Music, Theatre and Dance to be housed within the College of Arts and Sciences and led by Distinguished Professor of Music Education Jackie Wiggins, who will initiate the roles of Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance on an interim basis until a permanent associate dean can be hired,” said James P. Lentini, D.M.A., senior vice president for Academic Affairs, provost and professor of Music. “In addition, Dr. Wiggins will have an associate director and each of the departments will be headed by a department chair.”
 
“Growing Music, Theatre and Dance from a department into a school should help strengthen our position in the state and regionally, and also enhance our ability to continue recruiting some of the most talented students in all three disciplines,” added Kevin J. Corcoran, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “It should help increase our visibility so that we may serve our region better and open the door to more collaborative learning opportunities and important philanthropic opportunities.”
 
“We are very thankful for the Board’s recognition that the creation of this school was warranted by our blossoming programs and was the next logical step in our development,” said Jackie Wiggins, Ed.D., associate dean and director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance.
 
Oakland University was founded in 1957 as a liberal arts college and a part of Michigan State University. The Music Department was established in 1959 and Varner Hall opened in 1970 as the university’s home of performing arts education.
 
Theatre and Dance began as extra-curricular programs at Oakland University. Then, in 1982, the theatre and dance programs joined the existing music department, forming a Department of Music, Theatre and Dance.
 
Oakland’s performing arts programs earned accreditation from the National Association of Schools of Music, National Association of Schools of Theatre and National Association of Schools of Dance in 2001.
 
The department has flourished since that time, leading up to this week’s announcement of the formation of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance.
 
There are currently 172 faculty and staff members serving 3,400 Oakland University students with about 230 music majors, 110 theatre majors and 60 dance majors. Oakland’s School of Music, Theatre and Dance offers 23 degree programs – bachelor’s through doctoral – six minors and six professional certificate programs. A bachelor’s degree in Music Technology and Industry is also currently under review and the school maintains an active research center, the Center for Applied Research in Musical Understanding.
 
The School of Music, Theatre and Dance provides the campus and surrounding community with more than 200 performances and events each year. Its Music Preparatory Division teaches more than 300 community members each year, ranging from pre-schoolers through senior citizens.
 
Artists-in-residence affiliated with the Oakland University School of Music, Theatre and Dance include world-renowned jazz musician Regina Carter, the Oakland Symphony Orchestra and dance ensembles Eisenhower Dance and Take Root.
 
Professional partners of the school include the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, Meadow Brook Theatre Ensemble, Oakland Youth Orchestras, the Oakland University Cooperative Orchestral Library and Synergy on Stage.
 
The school also supports major study abroad programs, including Traditional Music and Dance Study in Ghana, participation in the Hydrama Theatre Festival in Greece and Dance Study in Germany.
 
Oakland is one of the few universities in the U.S. to have a Brass Band, which has achieved national and international recognition. It also has one of the few undergraduate musical theatre programs to take students to New York to connect with and perform for agents and producers, and to get advice from working actors.
 
In addition, Music, Theatre and Dance alumni have been highly successful in working in performing arts careers, including a voice alumna who recently made her debut at the esteemed La Scala Opera House in Milan, Italy.
 
Learn more about the School of Music, Theatre and Dance by visiting the website.
 
MISSION STATEMENT OF THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC, THEATRE AND DANCE

The School of Music, Theatre and Dance provides pre-professional, professional, liberal arts, and general education in the performing arts through artistically-grounded academic programs and diverse performance opportunities.

Our work is kinetic, alive, visceral––occurring collaboratively among learners and teachers, realizing learner potential, cultivating unique artistic voice––in artistically rigorous, authentic, interactive environments. 
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