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Business students get real-world economics lesson, help community

Excerpt

The Art & Apples Festival® is a staple of Rochester’s annual festival scene, attracting hundreds of artists and tens of thousands of visitors over the course of three days each September. Until the 2016 event, the exact number of attendees and the financial impact of the festival on the greater Rochester area was unknown by Rochester’s Paint Creek Center of the Arts (PCCA), festival organizer for more than 30 years.

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The man who built Detroit: Lawrence Tech offers Albert Kahn exhibits, events

Albert Kahn, the man who designed Detroit’s powerhouse industrial buildings, is the focus of several events and exhibitions at Lawrence Technological University this winter.
 
In the first half of the 20th Century, Kahn (1869-1942) revolutionized the design of industrial buildings around the world, and his prolific architectural office also saw the production of many commercial, institutional, and residential structures of lasting significance. As the centennial of numerous Kahn landmarks draws near, there is renewed and well-deserved interest in Kahn’s work.
 
The Albert Kahn Research Coalition is collaborating with the LTU Library and the LTU College of Architecture and Design’s Lectures and Exhibitions Committee to present exciting public programming to highlight this innovative period in architectural history. Other partners in this coalition are the University of Michigan, the Belle Isle Conservancy, the Detroit Institute of Arts,
the Detroit Historical Society, and the Detroit-based design firm that bears the founder’s name, Albert Kahn Associates. The purpose of the coalition is to preserve Albert Kahn’s legacy and educate the community on the importance of his work.
 
The exhibitions open at Lawrence Tech on Friday, Feb. 3 with “Albert Kahn under Construction,” on display in the UTLC Gallery, 21000 W. Ten Mile Road, Southfield. This digital exhibition focuses on the remarkable archive of construction photographs assembled by Kahn’s firm as they built the powerhouses of American industry, from Highland Park to Willow Run. The gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays and admission is free. This exhibit is curated by Claire Zimmerman, University of Michigan associate professor of architecture and history of art, and the LTU College of Architecture and Design Exhibitions and Lectures Committee, chaired by Diedre Hennebury, assistant professor of architecture and design.
 
On Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7 p.m., Joel Stone, Senior Curator at the Detroit Historical Society will speak on “The Ubiquitous Mr. Kahn: Albert Kahn’s Architectural Legacy” in the A200 Auditorium of Lawrence Tech’s Architecture Building. This presentation will examine Kahn’s career and the vast legacy of architectural treasures he created for the people of southeast Michigan. A gallery viewing and reception will follow. The lecture and reception are free and open to the public.
 
A partner exhibition will run from Friday, Feb. 17 through March 10 at LTU’s Detroit Center for Design + Technology, 4219 Woodward Ave., Detroit. In this midtown show, LTU’s College of Architecture and Design is partnering with the Belle Isle Conservancy for an exhibit titled “Albert Kahn at the Crossroads: The ‘Lost’ Belle Isle Aquarium and Horticultural Building Blueprints.” This compelling exhibit features several rediscovered blueprints from a private collection. Opened in 1904, the Belle Isle Aquarium is the oldest public aquarium in North America and the oldest aquarium-conservatory combination in the world. Independent architectural history scholar, Chris Meister and the Belle Isle Conservancy Historic Preservation Committee will provide a gallery talk Friday, Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Detroit Center for Design + Technology. The talk will be part of a ticketed evening event called “Deeper Dive: Albert Kahn” hosted by the Belle Isle Conservancy and will discuss the development of the public aquarium and botanical conservatory as building types. Ticket information is available at www.belleisleconservancy.org/deeperdive.
 
The culminating program of the Albert Kahn series is the Albert Kahn Research Symposium from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Friday, March 3 at Lawrence Tech. During the morning, Zimmerman will moderate a series of presentations on current research about Kahn. After a luncheon, another panel examines “Restoration and Adaptive Reuse of Kahn Buildings,” moderated by Dawn Bilobran, who has roles with three organizations – the Belle Isle Conservancy, the Michigan Historic Preservation Network and Preservation Detroit. Panelists include Chris Meister; Alan Cobb, CEO of Albert Kahn Associates; and Donald Bauman, Director of Architectural Development and Historical Preservation at Albert Kahn Associates. The symposium will also include exhibit viewing, and an open house in LTU’s Albert Kahn Collection, which consists of Kahn’s personal library, originally part of Kahn’s New Center office. Its components were disassembled, moved, and reassembled inside rooms of the LTU Library in 1982. Visit www.ltu.edu/albertkahn or call (248) 204-3000 for information and registration.
 
Lawrence Technological University, www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

Record 1.7 million visit Detroit Zoo in 2016

Excerpt

The Detroit Zoo drew nearly 1.7 million visitors last year, setting a new all-time high record and increasing the number of people coming through its gates for the 11th consecutive year.

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Troy Historic Village is offered a $50,000 federal grant from National Endowment for the Humanities

Troy Historic Village (THV) is delighted to announce that the Troy Historical Society (THS), which operates and runs THV, is one of only five Michigan cultural organizations to be awarded a Humanities Access Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). This significant federal grant will provide THS with a unique opportunity to raise $100,000 in two years for expanded programs and services, and to establish a permanent Endowment Fund.
 
“NEH provides support for projects across America that preserve our heritage, promote scholarly discoveries, and make the best of America’s humanities ideas available to all Americans,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “We are proud to announce this latest group of grantees who, through their projects and research, will bring valuable lessons of history and culture to Americans.”
 
“This grant is the shot of adrenalin the Troy Historical Society needs to expand our programs and put the Village onto the path of a fiscally sound future,” said Executive Director Loraine Campbell. “Raising the matching funds is a big challenge, but we have already secured the first donations.”  By April 30, 2017 THS must generate up to $25,000 through new restricted donations and memberships. NEH will match those funds, dollar for dollar. The total ($50,000) will be deposited and earn interest in a restricted bank account. THV has already raised some funds thanks to generous donations from a small group of Villagers. The goal is to raise the balance, through a membership drive for new individual, family, and business members!
 
Between May 1, 2017 and April 30, 2018, THS must generate another $25,000 through additional donations, memberships, matching grants, and a fundraising event. Further details will be published in future editions of the Village Press and on their website (www.troyistoricvillage.org) and social media pages. These funds will also be matched by NEH and deposited into the account.
 
Between June 2018 and 2021, THS will use the $100,000 and accumulated interest to implement new education and enrichment programs in the Village and increase the number of History to You (H2U) outreach programs provided throughout the seven-county Southeast Michigan region. Funds have also been budgeted for technology to support Village interpretive programs, supplies, and marketing. Finally, in 2020 THS will establish a permanent endowment fund and implement a program to encourage and accept legacy gifts and major donations. The endowment fund, required by the grant, will provide a source for long-term financial support for Village operations.
 
“I want to congratulate the Troy Historical Society on their successful grant proposal,” said Mayor Dane Slater. “The Troy Historic Village is our city’s cultural gem. “Through the Society’s hard work, it will shine brightly for future generations.”
 
Troy Historical Society is encouraging Village members and the public to invite their family and friends to become members of THS or to give a THS membership as a birthday, anniversary, or thank you gift. Businesses also can support the Village by purchasing a group package of THS memberships that can be given to their employees as a reward or gift. Every new membership will be matched dollar for dollar by NEH.
 
Troy Historic Village is a small dynamic history center owned by the City of Troy and operated by the Troy Historical Society. THV provides outstanding, engaging education programs that are rich in humanities content to over 20,000 Village visitors each year, including 13,000 students (grades K-5 and 8th grade), chaperones, and teachers from public, private, and charter schools in the tri-county (Oakland, Macomb, and Wayne Counties) metro-Detroit region.

ABOUT TROY HISTORIC VILLAGE
Troy Historic Village is located at 60 West Wattles Rd., Troy MI and is open year-round. The Village showcases ten historic structures in a charming five-acre complex. Visitors of all ages can explore Michigan history by witnessing and sharing the lifestyles of the pioneers who established homes and farms in rural Troy Township during the 1800s. Troy Historic Village serves the counties of Oakland, Wayne, and Macomb, providing a memorable and interactive experience for all visitors. Offering a wide variety of activities for children and a diverse range of lectures and events for adults, the Village aims to enhance appreciation of history while using Troy's rich and evolving story as a backdrop. In 2016 the Troy Historical Society’s marks its 50th Anniversary of conserving local history, connecting the community with heritage and continuing outstanding educational programs.
 
ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES
Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Enjoy a winter wonderland this January at Oakland County Parks and Recreation

Bundle up and head outdoors to enjoy all the frosty weather that January has to offer by going cross-country skiing, ice skating, fat tire biking, snowshoeing, sledding and ice fishing. If you prefer, stay indoors and participate in activities and programs at Wint Nature Center and Red Oaks Nature Center. Check out these upcoming events:
 
Jan. 1
  • Christmas tree recycling runs until Jan. 30 at the following Oakland County Parks: Addison Oaks; Catalpa Oaks; Glen Oaks Golf Course; Groveland Oaks; Independence Oaks; Lyon Oaks; Oakland County Farmers Market; Orion Oaks; Red Oaks Golf Course; Springfield Oaks; and White Lake Oaks Golf Course. Drop off trees from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. There is no charge to drop off trees, but plastic, tinsel and wire must be removed. No commercial trees accepted. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com for more information.
 
Jan. 7
  • NatureFit: Snowshoe Try It! is 10 a.m.-noon Jan. 7 at Wint Nature Center in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Learn about the history of snowshoes and then head outdoors for a guided snowshoe hike, campfire and snack. This program is appropriate for those ages 5 and older and snowshoes are provided. Participants must wear boots. A winter hike will be substituted if conditions do not permit snowshoeing. Cost is $5/person and pre-registration with payment is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or 248-625-6473 Saturdays. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com for more information.
 
Jan. 14
  • Youth Abilities – Saturday Sports Special will be held from 9:30-11 a.m. Jan. 14 at the Boys & Girls Clubs, 1545 East Lincoln Road in Royal Oak. Designed for children with disabilities ages 6-18, activities include parachute games, floor hockey, kickball, scooters, basketball and more. Individuals must pre-register by calling 248-424-7077. This program is limited to 20 participants. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or email Adaptive@oakgov.com for details.
  • Discover cooking secrets from local chefs and sample dishes using produce available from Oakland County Farmers Market vendors during a free cooking demonstration held in cooperation with edibleWOW from 10-11 a.m. Jan. 14. Oakland County Farmers Market is located at 2350 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford. For more information, call 248-858-5495 or visit OaklandCountyParks.com.
  • Fireside Chat: Legends of Michigan’s Past is 3-4:30 p.m. Jan. 14 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. Stay warm this winter by cozying up at the fireplace and learning all about the Anishanabe, who lived in Michigan hundreds of years ago. Join a naturalist for an afternoon of interactive storytelling and legends as well as traditional Native American games. Make a historic native trade item to take home. Cocoa, coffee and a snack will be served. Cost is $5/person. Pre-registration with payment required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or 248-585-0100 Saturdays.
  • If you have ever wanted to try ice fishing, attend Ice Fishing 101 from 3-5 p.m. Jan. 14 at Twin Chimneys Shelter in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Learn about ice fishing equipment and techniques, then try your hand at the sport if ice and weather conditions permit. If not, alternative fishing activities will be substituted. Participants ages 17 and older must have a valid Michigan fishing license. This program is appropriate for individuals ages 5 and older. Cost is $5/person and pre-registration with payment is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or 248-625-6473 Saturdays. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com for more information.
 
Jan. 21
  • Youth Abilities – Saturday Sports Special will be held from 9:30-11 a.m. Jan. 21 at the Boys & Girls Clubs, 1545 East Lincoln Road in Royal Oak. Designed for children with disabilities ages 6-18, activities include parachute games, floor hockey, kickball, scooters, basketball and more. Individuals must pre-register by calling 248-424-7077. This program is limited to 20 participants. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or email Adaptive@oakgov.com for details.
  • Wolves: Digging into the Past is set from 10 a.m.-noon or 2-4 p.m. Jan. 21 at Wint Nature Center in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Naturalists will help scouts complete the necessary requirements to achieve a badge. Snacks and materials are provided, but badges are not supplied by the nature center. Cost is $7/scout and $3/adult. Pre-registration is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or registration forms are available at OaklandCountyParks.com.
  • Daisies: Clover Petal – Use Resources Wisely is set from 10 a.m.-noon or 2-4 p.m. Jan. 21 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. Naturalists will help scouts complete the necessary requirements to achieve a badge. Snacks and materials are provided, but badges are not supplied by the nature center. Cost is $7/scout and $3/adult. Pre-registration is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or registration forms are available at OaklandCountyParks.com.
 
Jan. 28
  • Youth Abilities – Saturday Sports Special will be held from 9:30-11 a.m. Jan. 28 at the Boys & Girls Clubs, 1545 East Lincoln Road in Royal Oak. Designed for children with disabilities ages 6-18, activities include parachute games, floor hockey, kickball, scooters, basketball and more. Individuals must pre-register by calling 248-424-7077. This program is limited to 20 participants. Visit OaklandCountyParks.com or email Adaptive@oakgov.com for details.
  • Discover cooking secrets from local chefs and sample dishes using produce available from Oakland County Farmers Market vendors during a free cooking demonstration held in cooperation with edibleWOW from 10-11 a.m. Jan. 28. Oakland County Farmers Market is located at 2350 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford. For more information, call 248-858-5495 or visit OaklandCountyParks.com.
  • Daisies: Rosie Petal – Make the World a Better Place is set from 10 a.m.-noon or 2-4 p.m. Jan. 28 at Wint Nature Center in Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Naturalists will help scouts complete the necessary requirements to achieve a badge. Snacks and materials are provided, but badges are not supplied by the nature center. Cost is $7/scout and $3/adult. Pre-registration is required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or registration forms are available at OaklandCountyParks.com.
  • Cross-Country Ski School is scheduled from 10 a.m.-noon Jan. 28 at Independence Oaks County Park, 9501 Sashabaw Road, Clarkston. Learn to ski using your own gear or ski rental is included. Adaptive equipment is available; call ahead to reserve. Cost is $15/person. Daily pass or annual vehicle permit is required for park entry. Registration form is available at OaklandCountyParks.com. For more information, call John Haney at 248-858-1486 or email HaneyJ@oakgov.com.
  • Nature Sprouts is 10-11:45 a.m. Jan. 28 at Red Oaks Nature Center, 30300 Hales St., Madison Heights. The winter session of this nature program for 3-6 year olds accompanied by an adult will focus on “Shapes in Nature.” Indoor and outdoor hands-on nature discovery activities include a story, hike, craft and snack. Cost is $4/person. Pre-registration with payment required by calling 248-858-0916 weekdays or 248-585-0100 Saturdays.
 
For information on other events, visit OaklandCountyParks.com. Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @OCParksAndRec.
 

Novi second at marching band competition

Excerpt

Autumn colors and smells delighted the senses Oct. 29, but it was the unseasonably warm weather that added to the enjoyment of the hundreds that filled the Canton High School bleachers to watch 10 area bands take the gridiron with outstanding performances of music, marching, color and choreography.

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Historical Society collects funds to move train depot

Excerpt

The Milford Historical Society has raised approximately $17,000 since kicking off a fundraising campaign last month to move and restore the community's historic train depot.

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Celebrate Christmas in the Village

Come celebrate Christmas at Troy Historic Village where Santa will make a special appearance on Saturday, December 3rd! The Village is also an official drop-off location for Toys for Tots and will collect new, unwrapped toy donations between November 7th and December 5th.
 
Troy Historic Village will host its annual Christmas in the Village event on Saturday, December 3rd from 1-3pm. Guests can share in the sights and sounds of 19th and 20th century Christmas traditions as they explore ten restored and decorated historic buildings. Children can make a craft in an 1877 one-room schoolhouse; visitors of all ages can enjoy blacksmithing demonstrations in the 1870s Wagon Shop which originally provided Troy residents with iron farm tools, household utensils and wagon parts; and 19th century authentic cooking demonstrations in the 1840s log cabin. Families may visit with Santa inside Old Troy Church which was built in 1837 and originally located at Troy Corners (Livernois and Square Lake Rds.) where it served as a place of worship until 1963 and as an antique store until 1997. Another special treat for guests this year will be live music throughout the Village including an appearance by the cast of To Be Productions’ Little Women: The Musical to sing show tunes and traditional Christmas carols, as well as live harp and classical guitar performances that can be discovered while touring the Village.
 
The Village Gift Shop will be open for business for your Christmas shopping needs. “As we conclude our 50th Anniversary year, our holiday event will focus on simple family traditions that create lasting memories. We look forward to welcoming old and new friends to the Village, sharing with others through Toys for Tots, and experiencing traditional Christmas cheer!” said Loraine Campbell, Executive Director, Troy Historic Village. Price of admission is $5/Troy Historical Society Members, $7/Non-member and kids under 4 are free. There will be free onsite parking at the Village. For more info, visit www.troyhistoricvillage.org or call 248-524-3570.
 
As an official drop-off location for Toys for Tots, the Village will collect new, unwrapped toys during the December 3rd Christmas event and between November 7th and December 5th during business hours (M-F, 10am-3pm) which will be donated to less fortunate children in the community.
 
Christmas in the Village is sponsored by Genisys Credit Union with holiday greenery and hot mulled cider provided courtesy of the Troy Garden Club. Proceeds will benefit the Troy Historical Society that operates Troy Historic Village which is open year-round and includes ten historic structures in a charming five-acre complex located in the heart of Troy, Michigan. Here visitors of all ages can explore Michigan history by witnessing and sharing the lifestyles of the pioneers who established homes and farms in rural Troy Township during the 1800s.
 
Troy Historic Village is located at 60 West Wattles Rd., Troy MI. The Village showcases ten historic structures in a charming five-acre complex. Visitors of all ages can explore Michigan history by witnessing and sharing the lifestyles of the pioneers who established homes and farms in rural Troy Township during the 1800s. Troy Historic Village serves the counties of Oakland, Wayne, and Macomb, providing a memorable and interactive experience for all visitors. Offering a wide variety of activities for children and a diverse range of lectures and events for adults, the Village aims to enhance appreciation of history while using Troy's rich and evolving story as a backdrop. 2016 marks the Troy Historical Society’s 50th Anniversary of conserving local history, connecting the community with heritage and continuing outstanding educational programs.
 

Glide into winter on the Detroit Zoo's new skating rink

Detroit Zoo visitors can execute an Axel, complete a camel spin or simply float freestyle this winter on a new skating rink located in front of the frozen façade of the Polk Penguin Conservation Center.

The 1,548-square-foot Winter Rink, which can accommodate 31 skaters, is open now through February 2017.  Guests ages 4 and older can skate between 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily (last session is sold at 3:30 p.m.), weather permitting.  Skaters under 12 years old must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

A limited number of skates are available for rent for $7, which includes a 25-minute skating session.  The cost for guests who bring their own skates is $3.  Personal skates must be inspected by the rink attendant to ensure proper sharpness; sharpening will be provided.

“This is a perfect fit for the season and another great reason for families to visit the Zoo during the winter,” said Ron Kagan, executive director and CEO of the Detroit Zoological Society.

The Winter Rink is not made of ice, but of a synthetic plastic known as Glice® – a material composed of heat-pressed layers of polymers – so no water or electricity is required for operation.  The Detroit Zoo is one of only two zoos in the country to install a Glice® rink (the other is the Columbus Zoo).  Visit www.glicerink.com for additional information.

The Polk Penguin Conservation Center opened in April and is home to more than 80 penguins of four species – king, gentoo, macaroni and rockhopper.  It features a 326,000-gallon aquatic area, an underwater gallery with a vast acrylic window and two acrylic tunnels that provide breathtaking views of the penguins above, around and below, allowing guests to get nose to beak with the charismatic birds.

 

Alumna Jacquelyn Wagner to sing at La Scala

“I always knew I wanted to be an opera singer. At no time has that changed,” said music alumna Jacquelyn Wagner (BM ‘03) who enjoys a successful career in Europe singing in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain. 

This season Wagner will take her place among the world’s leading sopranos when she makes her debut at La Scala in Milan, Europe’s most prestigious opera house.

Jacquelyn will sing the lead role of Eva in Richard Wagner’s Die Meistersingervon Nürnberg from March 16 through April 5, 2017.

At Oakland University, Wagner earned a BM in Voice Performance, studying with Adjunct Assistant Professor of Voice Edie Diggory, with whom she had begun to work in high school. “She is one of the best voice teachers I have come across,” said Wagner. “The results that she can produce are unreal. She shaped my voice into what it is today.”

Professor John-Paul White, head of OU’s voice program, recognized Wagner’s unique qualities immediately. “Jacquelyn came to us with a beautiful voice," White said. "The first time I heard her sing as an incoming freshman, I was blown away. Given the beauty of her voice and her artistry, I never had any doubt she would have a rewarding career, but I think she benefited from our combined department with music, theatre and dance instruction because she was able to develop her stage presence. We encourage our students to take classes across the disciplines to improve their performance skills.”

Wagner continued her education at Manhattan School of Music where she completed an MM studying with opera star Mignon Dunn. She first sung in Europe after she auditioned for opera roles in New York as part of the New York International Opera Auditions (NYIOP) program. Her first contract was with Marseilles Opera in France where she performed the role of Fiordiligi in Cosi fan tutte. At the end of the season Wagner, who had been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship, left to study German Lied and German language.

Already this season Wagner has appeared in Carmen at the Royal Palace in Seville, and as Desdemona in Otello with Deutsche Oper am Rhein in Düsseldorf, but undoubtedly La Scala in March will mark a highpoint in her career, as it would for any singer.

Wagner enjoys her life in Europe, not just her work, but what she calls “the spectacular things: the history, museums, churches, nature.” Even so, she hopes one day to sing more often in American opera houses. She sang Arabella by Richard Strauss at the Minnesota Opera in 2013, and we look forward to any upcoming announcements that would allow more old friends and colleagues to enjoy her artistry. Maybe next season? Meanwhile toi, toi, toi at La Scala.

Read more about Jacquelyn Wagner on her website.
 

Walled Lake high marching band headed to London in '18

Excerpt

Marching band members at Walled Lake Northern High School were “high-stepping” Tuesday after receiving an invitation to perform at London’s New Year’s Day Parade in January 2018.

A delegation of British parade officials visited the 1,685-student school to personally extend the prestigious invitation, one of only 16 high school marching bands asked to take part in the 31/2 hour event. This year, more than 640,000 people lined the 21/2-mile parade route. About 8,000 people from 20 counties participate in the parade, which is broadcast to millions globally.

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The City of Wixom receives minigrant from the Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs

The City of Wixom has been awarded a Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs Minigrant via a Regional Regranting Agency. The grant, in the amount of $3,825, is distributed by the Anton Art Center, which is the Regional Regranting Agency for Macomb and Oakland Counties.
 
The grant will allow the City of Wixom to host the traveling exhibit entitled Forbidden Art, a collection of images of artwork created by concentration camp prisoners while imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II. This exhibition originated at Poland’s famed Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and is made up of twenty large color photographs of drawings and sculptures made by inmates of the Auschwitz, Buchenwald, and Ravensbrück concentration camps. Each of the photographs is accompanied by a historical commentary and a narrative account as to why the piece was created.
 
Forbidden Art will be installed at the Wixom Public Library from March 20 through April 6, 2017. This exhibit was developed and is presented in North America by The Polish Mission of the Orchard Lake Schools. It has been displayed at prominent institutions such as the United Nations, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, and many universities.
 
An opening reception is planned for the evening of March 19, 2016. Please see www.WixomGov.org for more information. 
 

Flagstar Strand Theatre announces donor wall design competition

The newly renovated Flagstar Strand Theatre in Pontiac, Michigan is accepting artist proposals to design  an original work of art for the theater that will also function as a  donor recognition installation.  The Flagstar Strand Theatre is a dynamic live performing arts venue with a history that dates back to 1921.  The restored theater proudly acknowledges the heritage of Pontiac's talented jazz artists and musical gatherings from the 1930's through the 60's and incorporates  repurposed materials from the  former Pontiac Central High School in its reconstruction.  With ardent admiration for the city of Pontiac's musical and creative roots, the Flagstar Strand Theatre carries on to create a new legacy of arts and entertainment.

The commissioned donor wall will be installed in the theater's main foyer, facing the front entrance and greeting visitors as they enter.  All mediums will be considered, including those requiring a light source.  The design must take into consideration the public's ability to walk within close range of the wall and should extend no more than one foot out from the wall.  The design must also include the capability to  add donor names as necessary after final installation.

The dimensions include one large central wall, 10.14 ft. wide by 10.92 ft. tall.  In addition, there are two side panels, each measuring 3.6 ft. wide by 10.92 ft. tall.  The project does not necessarily need to fill up all of the space.  The commissioned design will receive an award of $10,000 for the fabrication and installation of the final project. 

Please include as much detailed information as possible in the design proposal.  Drawings, sketches, or computer generated designs should include descriptions of colors, dimensions, and materials.  Files must be sent as JPEG or PDF files, no larger than 2MB.  Label each attached document with the artist's last name, first name and design title.  Please include a brief narrative description of the proposed design and information  about the artist(s): CV, website, web links or images of similar previous work.

All design proposals must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. on November 1st.  For further information and to submit a proposal, please send an email to info@flagstarstrandtheatrepontiac.com
 

Crowdfunding campaign launched for Lake Norcentra Park

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Michigan State Housing Development Authority and Rochester College with the City of Rochester and Rochester Hills today announced a new crowdfunding campaign through Michigan-based crowdfunding platform Patronicity. The campaign will support the project to enhance and preserve 14 acres of green space, wetlands, and woodlands in the heart of Rochester and Rochester Hills, which will be open and accessible to the public while connecting directly to downtown Rochester via the Clinton River Trail.

If the campaign reaches its crowdfunding goal or $50,000 by October 22, the project will win a matching grant with funds made possible by MSHDA and MEDC’s Public Spaces Community Places program. For project details and to donate, please visit: www.Patronicity.com/LakeNorcentra.

“We are excited to support the creation of Michigan’s first community-service learning park as part of the Public Spaces, Community Places program,” said MEDC Community Development Director Katharine Czarnecki. “The space creates more green space, increases direct connectivity to the local downtown, enhances boat and trail access and activates new space accessible for the public.”

The Lake Norcentra Park project affects 14 acres of Rochester College’s campus. The park sits next to the Clinton River Trail less than a mile from downtown Rochester. Lake Norcentra Park will offer the public free access to outdoor art, food, leisure activities, and nature with direct access from the Clinton River Trail connecting directly to Downtown Rochester.

Lake Norcentra Park features will include: Concessions and picnic garden accessible from Clinton River Trail, Public art installations (including Rochester Community Mural), Bench and hammock seating, Green space, Bike parking and repair station, Interpretive signage that shares the historic and natural features of the park, ADA-compliant pedestrian trails, Boat access (Clinton River), Fishing access (Clinton River and Lake Norcentra), Indoor/outdoor community activity center, Gathering places for outdoor learning programs and social activities, Live art, food, and music programs year-round, and K-12 outdoor science camps and field trips.

“The League strongly believes in the concept of placemaking and creating spaces that draw and attract people to a community,” said Dan Gilmartin, CEO and executive director of the Michigan Municipal League. “Having vibrant, accessible park areas are great placemaking tools for any community and if people support this crowdfunding effort for Lake Norcentra Park it can be a source of pride for the community for years to come.”

“Families at the college have known this place for decades and it’s special to a lot of them. Anything worth loving is worth sharing. We think it’s time to open Lake Norcentra Park to our neighbors in the community so it can become special to them as well,” said Tom Rellinger, VP of Development, Finance, and Operations at Rochester College. “We hope the park is a great asset to active lifestyles, education, and preserving nature in the Rochester region for decades to come.”

Public Spaces Community Places is a collaborative effort of the MEDC, MSHDA, the Michigan Municipal League, and Patronicity where local residents can use crowdfunding to be part of the development of strategic projects in their communities and be backed with a matching grant from MEDC. Communities, non-profits and other business entities can apply at https://patronicity.com/puremichigan.

Pure Michigan is a brand representing business, talent and tourism initiatives across Michigan. These efforts are driven by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, which serves as the state’s marketing arm and lead advocate for business growth, jobs and opportunity with a focus on helping grow Michigan’s economy.

For more on the MEDC and its initiatives, visit michiganbusiness.org. For Michigan travel news, updates and information, visit www.michigan.org. Michigan residents interested in seeking employment with any of Michigan’s growing companies should check mitalent.org, where more than 93,000 jobs are currently available in a variety of industries.

Survey says: bring more art, local programs to town

Excerpt

Even if business owners don’t have time to attend events in South Lyon, they want to see more of them for everyone.

Respondents to a recently released humanities survey also want to see more art in public places.

Read more.
 
359 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
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