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Orion Township Public Library teen department wins Best Buy Community Grant

The Orion Township Public Library was recently awarded the Best Buy Community Grant to help fund teen technology programming.

 

“The grant will strengthen the library’s ‘ThinkLink’ partnership with Lake Orion Community Schools,” said Teen Librarian, Dan Major. “This program provides library material delivery to schools as well as after school programming for middle school students.”

 

The money from the community grant will be used to purchase touch screen stations for three middle schools and Lake Orion High School.  These stations will allow students to request books for delivery and register for programs at the library.  The grant will also be used to convert our computer lab into a modern Makerspace.  The plans for the Makerspace include new equipment like a VHS/DVD converter, photo scanner and digitizer, laser engraver, digital art station, video editing software, and more.

 

“In addition, several Best Buy employees have generously volunteered for the ‘ThinkLink After School’ program,” said Major. “They will show middle school students some of the latest and greatest technology and teach them to create new and exciting projects in our freshly renovated Makerspace.”

 

For questions about the Best Buy Community Grant contact Dan Major at dmajor@orionlibrary.org, or 248.693.3000 x413. The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362 and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information visit orionlibrary.org.


Orion Township Public Library teen department wins Best Buy Community Grant

The Orion Township Public Library was recently awarded the Best Buy Community Grant to help fund teen technology programming.

 

“The grant will strengthen the library’s ‘ThinkLink’ partnership with Lake Orion Community Schools,” said Teen Librarian, Dan Major. “This program provides library material delivery to schools as well as after school programming for middle school students.”

 

The money from the community grant will be used to purchase touch screen stations for three middle schools and Lake Orion High School.  These stations will allow students to request books for delivery and register for programs at the library.  The grant will also be used to convert our computer lab into a modern Makerspace.  The plans for the Makerspace include new equipment like a VHS/DVD converter, photo scanner and digitizer, laser engraver, digital art station, video editing software, and more.

 

“In addition, several Best Buy employees have generously volunteered for the ‘ThinkLink After School’ program,” said Major. “They will show middle school students some of the latest and greatest technology and teach them to create new and exciting projects in our freshly renovated Makerspace.”

 

For questions about the Best Buy Community Grant contact Dan Major at dmajor@orionlibrary.org, or 248.693.3000 x413. The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362 and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information visit orionlibrary.org.


New Braille books for the youth department at the Orion Township Public Library

The Orion Township Public Library, with assistance from Seedlings Books in Livonia, MI, recently received a generous $1,000 grant from the Village Club Foundation in Bloomfield Hills, MI to enhance and expand their Braille book collection in the youth department.

 

“We focused on adding books that included words and pictures along with braille, so they can be used by a wide variety of kids and families, helping kids with vision loss along with teaching sighted readers about braille,” said Ashley Lehman, youth services head. “We also added a few longer Juvenile chapter books, Like Palacio’s Wonder, and Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach.”

 

The Village Club Foundation is the philanthropic arm of The Village Club in Bloomfield Hills, MI. The foundation's purpose is to further educational, cultural and civic activities; to promote philanthropic projects; and to operate for the good of the community.

 

For more information about the Braille book collection visit the Orion Township Public Library at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362, orionlibrary.org or call 248.693.3000.  The library is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.


Canterbury Village announces weekend pop-up market

Olde World Canterbury Village, located in Lake Orion, Mich., recently announced plans to open a renovated Weekend Pop-Up Market this fall featuring local Michigan vendors and artisans. Opening in September, Canterbury Village Weekend Pop-Up Market will be a free, indoor weekend shopping experience similar to Pop-Up Markets across the country that have grown in popularity.

“It was time to do something new here at Canterbury Village,” said Keith Aldridge. “We have a beautiful setting and facilities, and we want to offer that to local artisans and vendors looking for a space to sell their retail and products. It’s a great partnership with the community and helps us give back to local entrepreneurs.”

The landmark location, once home to the historic Scripps mansion, currently houses Yates Cider Mill at Canterbury Village, as well as Aldridge’s Always Christmas and other boutique shops. The Village also hosts events attended by hundreds throughout the year.

Canterbury Village Weekend Pop-Up Market is currently seeking artisans, vendors, specialty food items and boutiques to be featured in market areas. Vendors will have the option of leasing space for one week or for the entire season. Long term leasing will also have access to storage space.

“The Weekend Pop-Up Market will be perfect for those looking to sell their items for the holiday season,” said Aldridge. “With Yates at Canterbury Village located here, it also makes a great fall family day. We are truly excited about seeing more of the community visit Canterbury Village once again.”

Canterbury Village is located at 2359 Joslyn Court in Lake Orion. For more information, or to become a vendor, call 248-390-3974 or email ka@canterburyvillage.com. For more information on upcoming events at Canterbury Village, visit www.canterburyvillage.com.

Orion Township Public Library starts its own Repair Cafe

What do you do with a broken toaster? Or a piece of clothing that needs to be altered? Or with a hair dryer that won’t work? Toss it? No way! The Orion Township Public Library is organizing the first Repair Café on Saturday, April 14 from 1:00p to 4:00p.

 

Various volunteer repair experts will be available to help make all possible repairs FREE of charge. Tools and materials will also be on hand. People visiting the Repair Café will bring along their broken items from home. Toasters, lamps, hair dryers, clothes, bikes, furniture, toys...anything that is broken is welcome, and can most likely be repaired.

 

 “The Orion community has been very supportive of the Orion Green-Up and NOHAZ days, so we wanted to bring Repair Café to Orion as another opportunity to practice sustainability,” said Beth Sheridan, head of adult services. “Repair Café not only promotes fixing things rather than throwing them away, but also those with practical repair skills are given the opportunity to share that knowledge. Above all, Repair Café wants to show people how fun repairing things can be; it’s a win-win for everyone, including the environment!”

The Repair Café concept arose in the Netherlands, in 2009, and was formulated by Martine Postma, at the time an Amsterdam-bases journalist/publicist. In 2010, she started the Repair Café Foundation (see Repaircafe.org). This foundation provides support to local groups around the world wishing to start their own Repair Café.

 

For questions about the Repair Café contact Beth Sheridan at esheridan@orionlibrary.org, or 248.693.3000 x332. The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362 and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information visit orionlibrary.org.


World War I and America coming this fall to the Orion Township Public Library

The Orion Township Public Library is one of 120 institutions nationwide that was recently awarded a World War I and America grant to host a series of events about the impact of WWI in America. The grant marks the 100th anniversary of the nation’s entry into the war in 1917.

 

“We apply for grants like World War 1 and America to bring high-quality speakers to our library at minimal cost, and to speak about subjects of interest to our patrons that align with our library mission ‘To serve and engage a thriving community of life-long learners,’” said Beth Sheridan, head of adult services at the Orion Library. “We hope that veterans and their families, and any interested patrons in our community, will attend these programs which will explore the American experience of the war and its role in shaping the contemporary world.”

 

The Orion Library is hosting the following events in October and November:

 

Discussion Series

Join Oakland University’s Dr. Karen Miller as she moderates a series of three discussions of readings drawn from the book World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Register for the whole series or any of the evenings online, and stop by the library to pick up the readings being discussed to read ahead of time. Discussions will also include other forms of media related to each evening’s themes.


Wednesday, October 11 @ 7:00p

Why Fight? The Experience of War, Race and WWI


Wednesday, October 18 @ 7:00p

American Women at War, The Home Front: Selling Unity, Suppressing Dissent


Wednesday, October 25 @ 7:00p

America on the World Stage, At Home/Coming Home; The Toll of War
 

Book Discussion

Monday, October 16 @ 7:00p

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

Copies available after September 18 at the Adult Reference desk.

 

World War I “Hello Girl,” Oleda Christides

Wednesday, November 1 @ 7:00p

Join local storyteller Lois Keel as she shares the story of how bilingual operators helped General Pershing in France.

 

PTSD: a Discussion for Veterans and Their Families with Dr. Eric BeShears, clinical psychologist with the John D. Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Tuesday, November 14 @ 7:00p

 

The Makings of America: A WWI Home Front Story

Saturday, November 18 @ 2:00p

Historian Dennis Skupinski will present an interactive program about WWI and Michigan.

 

For more information visit orionlibrary.org/ww1america.

 

This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of The Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362 and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information visit orionlibrary.org.


Orion Township Public Library receives Friends donation

The Friends of the Orion Township Public Library recently presented a check for $10,000 to the Orion Township Public Library for funds raised at the Friends Passport to Spring Gala event which was held at the library at the end of April.

Over 300 guests attended The Passport to Spring: A Visit to Poland event when the library was filled with Polish music, food, culture, and entertainment.

“This donation will be used to upgrade the technology in the Teen Room at our library,” said Karen Knox, director, Orion Township Public Library. “Orion teens would like to be able to have access to the latest video game systems, chargers for their portable devices, and special software on the computers. With this generous donation from the Friends, we will be able to provide our teens with upgraded technology, which encourages them to keep coming to the library.”

Library staff plan to add these upgrades to the Teen Room this summer. Be sure to stop in a take a look!

The Friends of the Orion Township Library is a 501(c)3 organization whose volunteer members are dedicated to supporting and improving the library by raising funds for services, programs, projects, and resources not provided for by the general library budget.

The Friends are always looking for new members and volunteers! If you are interested in learning more about the Friends of the Orion Township Library, please visit orionlibrary.org/friends.

For more information, visit the Orion Township Public Library at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362, orionlibrary.org or call 248.693.3000.  The library is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.
 

Five Oakland County alternative transportation projects receive part of $9.2 million in funding

Excerpt: 

The Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) is helping fund five county alternative transportation projects. 

The council’s annual Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) is providing $9.2 million in funding for 22 projects across the region during Fiscal Year 2018, which begins Oct. 1.

Read more

LOHS students Cell Out for Soldiers

Excerpt

Amidst the wave of red t-shirt-clad teenagers were the typical sights one would expect at a high school: laughter, smiles, conservation, a reluctance to go to class.

What was missing from the scene? The texting, the lack of eye contact – the cell phones.

A record 1,950 high school students went phoneless on Friday, voluntarily taking part in Lake Orion High School’s third annual Cell Out for Soldiers fundraiser.

Read more.
 

Orion Township auto plant ranked eighth in nation for renewable energy usage

Workers at the General Motors Orion Assembly plant are readying the Chevrolet Bolt EV for its debut, and they're doing so in one of the nation's top facilities for renewable energy usage.
 
Orion Assembly was recently ranked eighth among users of renewable energy generated onsite among a group formed by the U.S. EPA, the Green Power Partners. It's news that fits for the Bolt EV, GM's new all-electric vehicle.

According to the company, 54 percent of the General Motors Orion Assembly plant is powered by clean energy. GM accomplishes this by capturing and using the methane gas emitted from a nearby landfill, turning the decomposing garbage into energy. Renewable energy accounts for $1 million in savings a year for the plant in Orion Township.

In addition to utilizing methane gas from a nearby landfill, Orion Assembly also sends energy back to the grid with its 350-kilowatt solar array. While it has a goal of promoting using 125 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020, the company says it will have already exceeded that goal before the end of 2016.

The plant also cuts down energy costs through its three-wet process, where three layers of paint are applied before running the Bolt EV for just one trip through the drying oven, rather than three. 

"EPA applauds Orion Assembly for its innovation in generating green power from an onsite landfill gas energy system and for taking a leadership position on the environment," says James Critchfield, manager of the Green Power Partnership.

The Green Power Partnership is a program launched by the EPA in 2001, encouraging companies to embrace renewable electricity through technical assistance and recognition. According to the EPA, green power is that of the highest environmental benefit.

In 2013, Orion Assembly met the EPA’s ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry when it lowered its energy intensity by 67 percent, avoiding 42,758 tons of CO2 emissions.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Orion Township Public Library hosts "Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human?"

Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human?, a national traveling exhibition exploring the complex field of human evolution research, will be on display at the Orion Township Public Library from Saturday, July 30 to Monday, August 22.
 
Through panels, interactive kiosks, hands-on displays and videos, Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human? invites audiences to explore milestones in the evolutionary journey of becoming human — from walking upright, creating technology and eating new foods, to brain enlargement and the development of symbolic language and complex societies — advancements that define the unique position of humans in the history of life.
 
Based on the Smithsonian’s What Does It Mean to Be Human? permanent exhibition hall at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human? seeks to shed light on what we know about human origins and how we know it. The exhibition welcomes different cultural perspectives on evolution and seeks to foster positive dialogue and a respectful exploration of the science.
 
“The topic of human evolution can be controversial, and we are proud that Orion Township Public Library can help encourage a constructive, informative discussion on the subject,” said Karen Knox, director. “We encourage people of all beliefs to explore the exhibition, as it delves into human origins in a way that is understandable, fulfilling, captivating and relevant.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by a series of free library programs, including presentations by Smithsonian scientists.  For more details visit orionlibrary.org.
 
Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human? was organized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with the American Library Association. This project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund.
 
The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362. The exhibition is free and open to the public during library hours, 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  For more information and a schedule of events visit orionlibrary.org or contact Beth Sheridan, head of adult services, at 248-693-3000 x332 or sheridan@orionlibrary.org.

Schedule of Events:
 
“What Does it Mean to Be Human?” Art Show
July 30-August 22
In conjunction with the Orion Art Center, we would like to invite artists of ALL AGES to enter artwork depicting their interpretation of “What does it mean to be human”? Enter your artwork by July 25 to the library, and be entered into a drawing for a participation prize! Art will be displayed in the library during the exhibit.
 
Human Evolution and Environmental Change
Wednesday, August 3 @ 7:00p
The evolution of humans is deeply connected with changes in their surrounding environment. Climate changes over the past few million years have affected hydrological and seasonal cycles and influenced the distribution of humans and other species used as food by ancient hunters and gatherers. Lead by experts in the field from Oakland University, we will explore these past trends and see how they apply to future challenges.
 
Official Exhibit Opening:  An Evening of Science
Saturday, August 6 @ 7:00p
Join Dr. Rick Potts, Smithsonian paleoanthropologist and curator of the Exploring Human Origins traveling exhibit, as he explores the main themes and messages of the traveling exhibit. The talk and following conversation will explore how fossils, archeological remains, and genetic studies shed light on our connection with the natural world and the origins of sharing, caring, and innovation.
 
Exploring Human Origins Educators Workshop
Monday, August 8, 10:00a-1:00p
This workshop is for classroom teachers; science, nature center and museum educators, homeschoolers, and other local educators. Dr. Briana Pobiner, who leads the Human Origins Program's education and outreach efforts, and Dr. Connie Bertka, co-chair of the Smithsonian Institution’s Broader Social Impacts Committee, will present a workshop on human evolution for science educators. It will feature exploration and hands-on practice in presenting the Human Origins Program resources provided for each community. These resources include a set of five early human skull casts with an accompanying classroom activity, classroom-tested, high-school biology teaching units.
 
Exploring the Meanings of Human Evolution? A Community Conversation
Monday, August 8 @ 7:00p
How do scientific discoveries about human origins relate to people’s personal understanding of the world and their place in it?  Join Dr. Connie Bertka and Dr. Jim Miller of the Smithsonian Institution’s Broader Social Impacts Committee as they encourage a community conversation about human evolution that helps us to understand each other’s perspectives. They will be joined by Dr. Rick Potts and Dr. Briana Pobiner from the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program.
 
Clergy Tour and Discussion
Tuesday, August 9 @ 9:00a
This is a dedicated, private time for clergy to view the exhibit while the library is not open to the public.  Dr. Rick Potts and Dr. Briana Pobiner, Smithsonian paleoanthropologists, will join the clergy in the exhibit space to discuss any questions clergy may have about the exhibit’s presentation of the science of human origins. The co-chairs of the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program’s Broader Social Impacts Committee, Dr. Connie Bertka and Dr. Jim Miller, will facilitate a discussion among the attending clergy regarding questions the exhibit may raise for their religious communities. A reception will follow. To register, call 248-693-3001.
 
Book discussions
Monday, August 15 @ 7:00p
Summer for the God: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate Over Science And Religion by Edward Larson
Monday, August 22 @ 7:00p
Your Inner Fish, by Neil Schubin
 
What is Archaeology?
Wednesday, August 17 @ 7:00p
Join Oakland University Professor Mike Pytlik, who leads OU students on annual archaeological digs in Israel, as he presents slides and artifacts from those exciting excavations. Find out how archaeologists know what they know!

Scientist Bio’s:
Dr. Rick Potts is a paleoanthropologist who directs the Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, where he also holds the Peter Buck Chair in Human Origins. Since joining the Smithsonian in 1985, Dr. Potts has dedicated his research to piecing together the record of Earth’s environmental change and human adaptation. Dr. Potts received his Ph.D. in biological anthropology from Harvard University in 1982, after which he taught anthropology at Yale University and served as curator of physical anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. Dr. Potts is curator of both The David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and the traveling exhibition “Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?”

Dr. Briana Pobiner is a paleoanthropologist and educator in the Smithsonian Institution’s Human Origins Program and will be traveling to several of the libraries hosting “Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human?” Dr. Pobiner leads the Human Origins Program's education and outreach efforts.

Dr. Connie Bertka holds a Ph.D. in Geology from Arizona State University and a M.T.S., Master of Theological Studies, from Wesley Theological Seminary. She is currently an independent scholar and consultant with Science and Society Resources, LLC. She is the Co-Chair of the Smithsonian Institution’s Human Origins Program’s Broader Social Impacts Committee. In addition to her research in planetary sciences, Dr. Bertka has had a long-term scholarly and pragmatic interest in the relationships between science and religion and their influence on the public’s understanding of science.
Rev. James Bradley Miller, PhD, is the president of the Presbyterian Association on Science, Technology and the Christian Faith.  He is an honorably retired ordained minister of the Presbyterian Church (USA) with an MDiv from Union Theological Seminary in Virginia and a Ph.D. in theology from Marquette University. Rev. Miller is currently serves as co-chair of the Broader Social Impacts Committee of the Human Origins Initiative at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.
 
Dr. Fabia U. Battistuzzi holds a Ph.D in Evolutionary Biology and Astrobiology from Pennsylvania State University and is an assistant professor at Oakland University. The aim of Dr. Battistuzzi's research is to understand when and how species have evolved and investigate the connections between their genetic innovations and variations in environmental conditions. Among all species, microbes span the largest duration of Earth history and are extremely metabolically and ecologically diverse. These characteristics make them a powerful resource to investigate evolutionary mechanisms over long (billions of years) and short (millions of years) timescales while tracing the origin of important ecological innovations such as pathogenicity and the origin of infectious diseases.

Dr. Mike Pytlik, Director of Judaic Studies, teaches The Archaeology of Israel, God Through Jewish History, Written Tradition of Judaism, Intro. to Judaism, and Monotheistic Mysticism. He is a frequent traveler to Israel, and has participated in several excavations in Israel. Since 2009 he has organized and leads a group of OU students to Israel for a tour and excavation field school. He is interested in the formation of the Israelite state, the development of the synagogue, Jewish Theology, Hebrew and the archaeology of Israel. He is very active in the Jewish community, is involved in Christian and Muslim Jewish dialogue groups. Mike is also the current faculty adviser for the Jewish Student Organization on campus. Mike holds a Doctor of Science in Jewish Studies from Spertus College, as well as a masters in Jewish Studies and a bachelor's degree in History.
 

Rochester Comm. Schools fifth grader "slam dunk" winner in 2016 Oakland County NoHaz poster contest

A Rochester Community Schools fifth grade student was chosen as the winner of the 2016 NoHaz poster contest for his basketball-themed entry that illustrated the safe and responsible way to dispose of household hazardous waste.

Domenic Bruno, a student at North Hill Elementary School, called his entry "Slam Dunk the Junk." It was chosen from among more than 250 entries submitted by elementary schools in Orion Township, Rochester, Rochester Hills and Waterford Township.

"It is impressive to see the depth of knowledge these students have regarding recycling and the proper disposal of household hazardous waste,” Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson said. “They really do a great job of telling the story. I congratulate them, and their teachers and their parents, for instilling in them the importance of being responsible stewards of our environment.”

The winning artwork was incorporated into the 2016 NoHaz publicity posters, which are on display throughout the 17 member municipalities of the NoHaz Consortium. The consortium initiated the art contest to educate and engage students about the importance of recycling and proper disposal. Bruno received a gift card and award certificate, as did several other finalists. All students who entered received a NoHaz certificate of appreciation.

The NoHaz Consortium provides residents with a safe and responsible means for the disposal of household hazardous waste. Collection events are scheduled throughout the season.

"These collection events demonstrate the commitment and understanding our residents have to being environmental responsible and ensuring our communities remain great places to live, work and play," Patterson said.

The 2016 collection events are from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the following Saturdays:
  • April 30 at Oxford Middle School, 1420 Lakeville Road, Oxford
  • May 21 at North Sashabaw Elementary School, 5290 Maybee Road, Clarkston
  • June 11 at Oakland University, Parking Lots 35, 37, in Rochester
  • Sept. 10 at Oakland Community College Highland Lakes Campus, 7350 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford
  • Oct. 15 at Wildwood Amphitheater, 2700 Joslyn Court, Orion Township
NoHaz member communities are Addison Township, Clarkson, Groveland Township, Independence Township, Lake Angelus, Lake Orion, Leonard, Oakland Township, Orion Township, Oxford Township, Oxford, Pontiac, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Rose Township, Springfield Township and Waterford Township. Visit www.NoHaz.com for more details on NoHaz or the collection events. 

Oakland County Parks offers group rate on 2016 annual vehicle permits

Oakland County Parks and Recreation is offering a group discount rate on its 2016 annual vehicle permits when purchased in lots of 25 or more.

Aimed at businesses, neighborhood associations and other large groups, the discount provides a financial break when the permits are purchased in volume. Purchased individually, the permits are $30 each. The discounted prices are $25 each for 25-100 permits; $20 each for 101-250 permits; or $15 each for 251-500 permits.

The permits provide access to these eight Oakland County Parks that house 68 miles of trails, nature centers, dog parks, beaches and other amenities:
  • Addison Oaks – Leonard
  • Groveland Oaks – Holly
  • Highland Oaks – Highland
  • Independence Oaks – Clarkston
  • Lyon Oaks – Wixom
  • Orion Oaks – Orion Township
  • Rose Oaks – Holly
  • Red Oaks Dog Park and Nature Center – Madison Heights 
In addition, vehicle permit holders receive free entry to the Fourth of July fireworks at Addison Oaks and Groveland Oaks county parks, as well as free parking at the Oakland County Fair on two Oakland County Parks Days in 2016 at Springfield Oaks County Park.

The 2016 annual vehicle permits are valid through Dec. 31, 2016. Contact program administrator Karen Kohn at 258-858-4606 or kohnk@oakgov.com for details.

Oakland County Parks and Recreation is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2016. Throughout the years, the parks system has grown to include more than 6,700 acres of preserved park land within 13 parks. The parks offer residents a wide variety of year-round recreation opportunities. Featured within the parks system are two nature centers, five golf courses, two waterparks, three dog parks, two campgrounds, a BMX track and the Oakland County Market.
 
Oakland County Parks events can be found on DestinationOakland.com. Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @DestinationOak.
 

Orion Township Public Library receives 2015 Library of Congress Literacy Award

The Orion Township Public Library has received the 2015 Library of Congress Literacy Award from the Michigan Department of Education for helping children learn to read.  The award was presented to the Library’s Head of Youth Services Deb Refior by the Michigan Center for the Book (MCB), in conjunction with the National Center for the Book, at a recent Orion Township Public Library board of directors meeting.
 
“We are so honored to receive this outstanding award,” said Refior, who wrote the application.  “We will use the child-friendly tablet in our youth programs.” 
 
In addition, the Orion Township Public Library received $500 to use for youth programming. 
 
The Orion Township Public Library was selected by peer libraries and MCB affiliates. It edged out other applicants for having consistently excellent programming, a partnership with local schools, and pairing of innovation with technology. A librarian liaison is assigned to each school in its district, and they help to fulfill requests from teachers and students during the school year.
 
For more information, patrons can visit orionlibrary.org, by call 248.693.3000.  The Orion Township Public Library is located at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362, and is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a-5:00p Friday and Saturday.  

The Giving Season: Author/Illustrator Fair at Orion Township Public Library

It is almost Holiday time and the Orion Township Public Library is celebrating with a Local Author/Illustrator Fair on Saturday, December 5 from 1:00p.m. to 4:00p.m. In addition, Santa will be at the library to read Holiday stories and meet with kids of all ages!
 
“We are excited to have authors and illustrators from the Metro Detroit area including our very own Ms. Kristen,” said Library Director, Karen Knox. “This is the perfect opportunity to find holiday gifts!”
 
Books for readers of all ages will be available for signing and purchase. Authors attending will include Emma Arendoski, Evans Bissonette, Emlyn Chand, Bryan Chick, Rock DePerno, Jean Alicia Elster, Matt Faulkner, Denise Fleming, Ronald Herron, Andy Lockwood, SJ Lomas, Ruth McNally Barshaw, Deb Pilutti, Kristen Remenar, Monica Sholar, J. Thomas-Like, Nancy E. Shaw, Cathy Gendron, Leslie Helakoski, Laura Lee,  Jacqueline Tinney, Kathryn Allen, Anna Clark, Rebecca Belliston, and Linda K. Sienkiewicz.

For more information about the Author Fair contact Kristen Remenar, youth librarian, at 248-693-3000 x340 or kremenar@orionlibrary.org, or visit the Orion Township Public Library at 825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI 48362.  The library is open 9:30a-9:00p Monday through Thursday and 9:30a.m. - 5:00p.m. Friday and Saturday.
 
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